"The Springtime of the Renaissance"

From September 26, 2013 to January 06, 2014
  • Maso di Bartolomeo (Capannole Valdambra 1406 - Raguse de Dalmatie, 1456). Coffret reliquaire de la Sainte Ceinture, 1446-1448, cuivre doré, ivoire, bois. Prato, musée de l’Oeuvre de la cathédrale, inv. AGJ 1777

    Maso di Bartolomeo (Capannole Valdambra 1406 - Raguse de Dalmatie, 1456). Coffret reliquaire de la Sainte Ceinture, 1446-1448, cuivre doré, ivoire, bois. Prato, musée de l’Oeuvre de la cathédrale, inv. AGJ 1777

    © Fototeca Ufficio Beni Culturali Diocesi di Prato

"The Springtime of the Renaissance" 75001 Paris fr

Following upon major exhibitions devoted to masters of the High Renaissance - Leonardo da Vinci and Raphael - The Spingtime of the Renaissance deals with the genesis of this major artistic and cultural movement, which first arose in Florence in the early years of the fifteenth century.

Sculpture, an essential aspect of this rebirth, is the central focus of this exhibition. Some 140 works are presented, including several monumental ones, grouped into ten thematic sections. In addition to sculptures, the exhibition also features paintings, drawings, manuscripts, silver and gold pieces, and tin-glazed earthenware (majolicas).

Sculptures by Donatello, including monumental works, busts and reliefs, serve as one of the threads running through the exhibition, by way of the presentation of several of the greatest masterpieces by this artist, considered by many as the most creative exponent of the early Renaissance. However, his works do not in any way eclipse the virtuosity of contributions by other illustrious sculptors, including creative geniuses such as Ghiberti, Nanni di Banco, Luca della Robbia, Nanni di Bartolo, Michelozzo, Agostino di Duccio, Desiderio da Settignano and Mino da Fiesole.

Their sheer number and wide-ranging output aptly demonstrate the extent to which the first half of the century was exceptionnally rich in artists of the very highest caliber. Each of these sculptors is represented in the exhibition by several works, so that visitors may fully appreciate the contributions and varied nature of each artist's oeuvre.

Brunelleschi and Ghiberti's competition panels for the second set of bronze doors of the Battistero di San Giovanni (1401), Donatello's monumental sculptures for Orsanmichele and the Campanile, Luca della Robbia's splendid enameled terra-cotta pieces, and the exceptional series of Florentine portrait busts in the last room of the exhibition are just some of the major works on display that reveal the flowering of artistic creation during this period in Florence. As such, they are among the key elements having established this city as the unparalleled creative hub of the new Renaissance style, giving rise to the persistent legend of Florence across the centuries.

Opening times

Open every day except on tuesdays, from 9am to 5.45pm, wednesdays and fridays until 9.45pm.

Admission fees and rates

  • Specific ticket for The Springtime of the Renaissance: 13 €
  • Paired ticket (permanent collections + The Springtime of the Renaissance exhibition) : 16 € before 6pm, 12 € after 6pm on wednesdays and fridays
  • Free access for children under 18

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